Resources for Health Care Providers

Latest Guidance for Health Care Providers:

COVID-19 Testing Prioritization Guidance for Providers

COVID-19 Serology Testing Guidelines for Use

COVID-19 Guidance for Dentists 

 

Health Care Professionals: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Q: What are the clinical features of COVID-19?
A: The clinical spectrum of COVID-19 ranges from mild disease with non-specific signs and symptoms of acute respiratory illness, to severe pneumonia with respiratory failure and septic shock. There have also been reports of asymptomatic infection with COVID-19.

Q: Who is at risk for COVID-19?
A: Currently, those at greatest risk of infection are persons who have had prolonged, unprotected close contact with a patient with symptomatic, confirmed COVID-19 and those who live in or have recently been to areas with sustained transmission.

Q: Who is at risk for severe disease from COVID-19?
A: The available data are currently insufficient to identify risk factors for severe clinical outcomes. From the limited data that are available for COVID-19 infected patients, and for data from related coronaviruses such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, it is possible that older adults, and persons who have underlying chronic medical conditions, such as immunocompromising conditions, may be at risk for more severe outcomes.

Q: When is someone infectious?
A: The onset and duration of viral shedding and period of infectiousness for COVID-19 are not yet known. It is possible that SARS-CoV-2 RNA may be detectable in the upper or lower respiratory tract for weeks after illness onset, similar to infection with MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. However, detection of viral RNA does not necessarily mean that infectious virus is present. Asymptomatic infection with SARS-CoV-2 has been reported, but it is not yet known what role asymptomatic infection plays in transmission. Similarly, the role of pre-symptomatic transmission (infection detection during the incubation period prior to illness onset) is unknown. Existing literature regarding SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses (e.g., MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV) suggests that the incubation period may range from 2–14 days.

Q: Which body fluids can spread infection?
A: Very limited data are available about detection of SARS-CoV-2 and infectious virus in clinical specimens. SARS-CoV-2 RNA has been detected from upper and lower respiratory tract specimens, and SARS-CoV-2 has been isolated from upper respiratory tract specimens and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. SARS-CoV-2 RNA has been detected in blood and stool specimens, but whether infectious virus is present in extrapulmonary specimens is currently unknown. The duration of SARS-CoV-2 RNA detection in upper and lower respiratory tract specimens and in extrapulmonary specimens is not yet known but may be several weeks or longer, which has been observed in cases of MERS-CoV or SARS-CoV infection. While viable, infectious SARS-CoV has been isolated from respiratory, blood, urine, and stool specimens; in contrast, viable, infectious MERS-CoV has only been isolated from respiratory tract specimens. It is not yet known whether other non-respiratory body fluids from an infected person, including vomit, urine, breast milk, or semen, can contain viable, infectious SARS-CoV-2.

Q: Can people who recover from COVID-19 be infected again?
A: The immune response to COVID-19 is not yet understood. Patients with MERS-CoV infection are unlikely to be re-infected shortly after they recover, but it is not yet known whether similar immune protection will be observed for patients with COVID-19.

Q: How should health care personnel protect themselves when evaluating a patient who may have COVID-19?
A: Although the transmission dynamics have yet to be determined, CDC currently recommends a cautious approach to persons under investigation (PUI) for COVID-19. Health care personnel evaluating PUI or providing care for patients with confirmed COVID-19 should use Standard Transmission-based Precautions. See the Interim Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations for Patients with Known or Patients Under Investigation for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Healthcare Settings.

Q: Are pregnant health care personnel at increased risk for adverse outcomes if they care for patients with COVID-19?
A: Pregnant health care personnel (HCP) should follow risk assessment and infection control guidelines for HCP exposed to patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. Adherence to recommended infection prevention and control practices is an important part of protecting all HCP in health care settings. Information on COVID-19 in pregnancy is very limited; facilities may want to consider limiting exposure of pregnant HCP to patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19, especially during higher-risk procedures (e.g., aerosol-generating procedures) if feasible based on staffing availability.

Q: Should any diagnostic or therapeutic interventions be withheld due to concerns about transmission of COVID-19?
A: Patients should receive any interventions they would normally receive as standard of care. Patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 should be asked to wear a surgical mask as soon as they are identified and be evaluated in a private room with the door closed. Health care personnel entering the room should use Standard and Transmission-based Precautions.

Q: How do you test a patient for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19?
A: See recommendations for reporting, testing, and specimen collection at Interim Guidance for Healthcare Professionals.

Q: Will existing respiratory virus panels, such as those manufactured by Biofire or Genmark, detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19?
A: No. These multi-pathogen molecular assays can detect a number of human respiratory viruses, including other coronaviruses that can cause acute respiratory illness, but they do not detect COVID-19.

Q: How is COVID-19 treated?
A: Not all patients with COVID-19 will require medical supportive care. Clinical management for hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is focused on supportive care of complications, including advanced organ support for respiratory failure, septic shock, and multi-organ failure. Empiric testing and treatment for other viral or bacterial etiologies may be warranted.

Corticosteroids are not routinely recommended for viral pneumonia or ARDS and should be avoided unless they are indicated for another reason (e.g., COPD exacerbation, refractory septic shock following Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines).

There are currently no antiviral drugs licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat COVID-19. Some in-vitro or in-vivo studies suggest potential therapeutic activity of some agents against related coronaviruses, but there are no available data from observational studies or randomized controlled trials in humans to support recommending any investigational therapeutics for patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 at this time. Remdesivir, an investigational antiviral drug, was reported to have in-vitro activity against COVID-19. A small number of patients with COVID-19 have received intravenous remdesivir for compassionate use outside of a clinical trial setting. A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of remdesivir for treatment of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 respiratory disease has been implemented in China. A randomized open label trial of combination lopinavir-ritonavir treatment has been also been conducted in patients with COVID-19 in China, but no results are available to date. Trials of other potential therapeutics for COVID-19 are being planned. For information on specific clinical trials underway for treatment of patients with COVID-19 infection, see clinicaltrials.gov.

Q: Should post-exposure prophylaxis be used for people who may have been exposed to COVID-19?
A: There is currently no FDA-approved post-exposure prophylaxis for people who may have been exposed to COVID-19. Click here for more information on movement restrictions, monitoring for symptoms, and evaluation after possible exposure to COVID-19.

Q: Whom should health care providers notify if they suspect a patient has COVID-19?
A: Health care providers should consult with local or state health departments to determine whether patients meet criteria for a Persons Under Investigation (PUI). Providers should immediately notify infection control personnel at their facility if they suspect COVID-19 in a patient.

Q: Do patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 need to be admitted to the hospital?
A: Not all patients with COVID-19 require hospital admission. Patients whose clinical presentation warrants inpatient clinical management for supportive medical care should be admitted to the hospital under appropriate isolation precautions. Some patients with an initial mild clinical presentation may worsen in the second week of illness. The decision to monitor these patients in the inpatient or outpatient setting should be made on a case-by-case basis. This decision will depend not only on the clinical presentation but also on the patient’s ability to engage in monitoring, the ability for safe isolation at home, and the risk of transmission in the patient’s home environment.

Q: When can patients with confirmed COVID-19 be discharged from the hospital?
A: Patients can be discharged from the health care facility whenever clinically indicated. Isolation should be maintained at home if the patient returns home before the time period recommended for discontinuation of hospital Transmission-Based Precautions described below.

Decisions to discontinue Transmission-Based Precautions or in-home isolation can be made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with clinicians, infection prevention and control specialists, and public health based upon multiple factors, including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for COVID-19 in respiratory specimens.

COVID-19 Serology Testing Guidelines for Use
COVID-19 Serology Testing Guidelines for Use
COVID-19 Testing Prioritization Guidance for Providers
COVID-19 Testing Prioritization Guidance for Providers
All Documents
All Documents

A wide-array of CDC guidelines for healthcare providers and informational documents. 


Agency News

Coronavirus

Coronavirus

With the ongoing coverage of the 2019 novel Coronavirus (n-CoV), Tulare County Health & Human Services Agency's Public Health Branch is providing helpful reminders on steps to prevent illness.

Wash Your Hands Often to Stay Healthy

Wash Your Hands Often to Stay Healthy

Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Learn when and how you should wash your hands to stay healthy.

COVID-19 Printable Resources

COVID-19 Printable Resources

Printable resources are available as educational pieces can assist those who are at home, on the job, or for the general public to answer questions. These pieces are available in English and Spanish.