Summer Safety a Top Priority

Summer Safety a Top Priority

Tulare County Public Health wants you to have the best summer ever this year, and public safety measures can help ensure your summer is full of positive memories.

Here are our top tips to help you be safe:

  • NEVER leave people or animals in a car in hot weather, even with the windows partway down. Temperatures can easily reach 120° F. and cause heat-related illness or death.
  • When you are out at dawn or dusk, wear long pants and long sleeves, in addition to using insect repellent, to prevent mosquito bites, as they can carry West Nile Virus and St. Louis Encephalitis.
  • Avoid direct sun, but if you can’t avoid it, wear a head covering and sunscreen.
  • Keep curtains closed during the heat of the day to keep your home or apartment cooler.
  • If you do not have air conditioning, visit your local shopping center or library where you can stay cool.
  • Stay hydrated during hot or humid weather. The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly three liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day. The AI for women is 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) per day. 
  • Store food safely during the heat to avoid food poisoning.
  • Outside animals need protection from heat and sun, and plenty of fresh, cool water. If heatstroke occurs, take action by applying ice packs or cool water over the head, neck, and chest area, and call your veterinarian.

California’s Swimming Pool Safety Act (Health and Safety Code §§115920-115929) requires at least one approved safety barrier be in place for all pools and spas built after January 1, 1998, and for any pools being remodeled. Property owners should voluntarily install barriers around pools that have been constructed prior to 1998. Also:

  • More California toddlers are killed by accidental drowning than by any other kind of accident. If a child is missing, always look first in the pool.
  • Never swim alone and when children are in the water, ensure an alert adult pays constant attention, and wait a half hour to swim after eating.
  • Parents, babysitters, guardians, day care workers, and anyone supervising children should take the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) course annually.
  • Children and their parents should wear life jackets when on any watercraft.

The safest way to enjoy a fireworks display this 4th of July holiday is to watch one conducted by professionals. However, if you decide to use legal, safe, and sane fireworks, be sure to follow these important safety tips:

  • Never allow young children to handle fireworks; older children should use fireworks only under adult supervision.
  • Light fireworks outdoors in a clear area away from onlookers, houses, and flammable materials.
  • Light one device at a time; maintain a safe distance after lighting.
  • Do not allow any running or horseplay while fireworks are being used.
  • Never ignite devices in a container.
  • Do not try to re-light or handle malfunctioning fireworks; soak them in a bucket of water and discard them safely.
  • Many pets become agitated or even panicked when they hear fireworks. If your pets are at risk of such behaviors, decide if you must stay home to comfort them. If your pets escape during a fireworks show, ensure you call your local animal services facility to report them missing. Tulare County Animal Services can be reached at (559) 636-4050.

Agency News

County Establishes New Veteran Advisory Committee

County Establishes New Veteran Advisory Committee

The Tulare County Board of Supervisors has approved the creation of The Tulare County Veteran Advisory Committee. Its purpose is to advise and assist HHSA with ongoing efforts to enhance current services. 

2019 Walk with a Doc Program

2019 Walk with a Doc Program

Walk with a Doc is a free community outreach program, which strives to encourage healthy physical activity in people of all ages. Each month a different health topic will be covered.  

Pets and Heat

Pets and Heat

We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but hot weather can prove dangerous. Dogs are not good at keeping themselves cool, so providing protection for our pets in hot weather is critical. 

Summer Safety a Top Priority

Summer Safety a Top Priority

Tulare County Public Health wants you to have the best summer ever this year, and public safety measures can help ensure your summer is full of positive memories.